Republican presidential candidate hopeful Rick Santorum made it clear to the standing room only crowd at Columbia’s Grace Bible Church on Friday, Feb. 3 that he is not in favor of Barak Obama’s health care plan but is for the family and stands strong on moral issues.

Republican presidential candidate hopeful Rick Santorum signs a book for Candance Brockerstedt of Mexico, MO. Candance has 15 children "some homegrown and some handpicked, but we don't distinguish between the two."

“This election is more important than any other,” he said. “If Obama wins everyone in the nation will be dependent on the government. When government gives you the right to healthcare, they will tell you what you have the right to do. They will make you back down from what you believe because the government now owns you.”

James Dobson, best-selling author and Focus on the Family founder, led the questions for the forum dubbed America’s Heartland.  “As of Jan. 1 if a person is over 70 years of age and has a cranial bleed they will not be granted treatment, only palliative care to make them feel better. “

He further explained that to get treatment “a panel of bureaucrats” in Washington, D.C. would have to decide.  “This is a death panel,” he said.

Santorum added that the same type of criteria could be placed on the other end of spectrum.  “We have a special needs child. When a child is born with disabilities how do we begin to value their life?”

The differences on the health care issue between Mitt Romney and Obama, according to Santorum, is that Romney believes the authority for health care should be in the hands of the states instead of the federal government. Otherwise, the plans are fundamentally the same, Santorum said.

The father of seven explained how his daughter, Bella, born with Trisomy 18, is always happy. “Bella does one thing. She loves unconditionally. She cannot do anything for me.  It shows me how the Father looks at me. I am completely disabled in the sight of God and can do nothing for Him but he loves me unconditionally.”

Dobson honored Santorum for being the only candidate who “consistently talks about the family.  If we lose the family, everything else falls.”

Santorum agreed adding that today there is a decline in marriage. “When marriage breaks down, government gets bigger,” he said. Single parents have to do the job designed for two parents.

To help encourage families, the former Pennsylvania senator is in favor of repealing the marriage penalty tax and giving higher tax deductions to families with children.  “The greatest resource we have is our children,” Santorum added.

He agrees with Dobson’s desire to see a Family Protection Act putting in place stipulations that before any law is passed it would be researched as to how it affects the family. Dobson and Santorum both agree that the institution of marriage is defined as that between one man and one woman.

Santorum explained the anxiety he feels from Americans as he travels across the country.

“It’s not just those suffering from economic difficulties but even those doing well financially are anxious for this country,” Santorum said. He added that Americans want to see true and honored traditions renewed and restored.

“We feel a common responsibility as Americans to take this country and improve upon it.  Who wants to be the generation who let it slip?”

Foster Friess, a Wyoming billionaire who is throwing major dollars towards Santorum’s campaign also spoke Friday.  He explained that he believes Santorum has a much better chance of beating President Obama than the other Republican candidates.  Listing such attributes as 53 years old, grandson of a coal minor, demonstrated ability to win blue collar votes and a man of modest means as reasons he can bring out the votes.

“I have the best vision for the country and the clearest contrast with Obama,” Santorum said.

Dobson added that three things impress him about Santorum: his love for the family, his stance on moral issues and Santorum’s wife Karen who home schools their children even though she has law and nursing degrees.

By phone, Karen told the audience, “We all have different roles to play in this campaign.  Mine is at home. We do not know where the road is going but, we are on the journey.”

Santorum assured those present that he is not getting out of the race.  “I am confident something is going on in the people.”  He added that if people start looking at the candidates and what they stand for “we will do well.”

If elected President, Santorum recited a list of issues he would attack shortly after moving into the White House on Jan. 20, 2013. All issues, he said would be designed to move the country forward. These included “firing every czar in the house”, repealing Obama care (although he points out 60 votes would be needed in the Senate), taking a close look at extreme environmental issues and other regulations, stopping federal funding of stem cell research and Mexico abortions and moving the Keystone Oil Pipeline forward among other things.

However, the first thing Santorum says would happen on Jan. 20, 2013 is “a lot of prayer in that house.”

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Teresa Shields Parker
Teresa Shields Parker is a Christian weight loss author, coach and speaker, who has lost more than 260 pounds. Her book, "Sweet Grace: How I Lost 250 Pounds and Stopped Trying to Earn God's Favor", is the number 1 Christian Weight Loss Memoir on Amazon. She has two more books, "Sweet Freedom: Losing Weight and Keeping It Off With God's Help" and "Sweet Change: True Stories of Transformation" in addition to "Sweet Grace" and "Sweet Freedom Study Guides". Her fourth book "Sweet Hunger: Developing An Appetite for God" will be available in summer 2017. All books are on Amazon. Her Coaching Programs can be found under the Weight Loss or writing tabs at TeresaShieldsParker.com. To book Teresa for your next event, check the Speaking Tab.

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